Voyages and travels in the years 1809, 1810, and 1811; containing statistical, commercial, and miscellaneous observations on Gibralter, Sardinia, Sicily, Malta, Serigo, and Turkey

Voyages and travels in the years 1809, 1810, and 1811; containing statistical, commercial, and miscellaneous observations on Gibralter, Sardinia, Sicily, Malta, Serigo, and Turkey
Author: unknown
Format: Paperback
Pages: 120
Publisher: RareBooksClub.com (May 15, 2012)

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1812 Excerpt: …a large slab, which he assured us was the tomb-stone of the victims! ZEITtTN. Just as the tops of the minerets were lighted, we arrived in Zeitun, and found excellent lodgings in the house of a merchant engaged in the corn-trade of the country, and who was also a farmer of the tithes of several of the neighbouring villages. The city stands on the side of a hill, at the entrance into a small vale at the head of the gulf; but at some distance from the shore. Being interspersed with gardens and cypress-trees, the general aspect of the place is pleasant. A ruinous fortress, on the top of the hill, gives it also an air of dignity. The population does not exceed six thousand souls. Some years ago, a new seraglio was built for the governor, at an expence of about twelve thousand pounds sterling; but it was scarcely finished, when a fire took place, and destroyed it entirely. There is here a trifling manufactory of cloth, and a considerable one of salt. The adjacent territory would be fertile; but the oppression which dismays the whole country renders it neglected, and almost desolate. Zeitun is the capital of a district, the governor of which is connected, by marriage and interest, with the family of Ali Pashaw, a part of of it as such, the ruins of the one very rude piece of sculpture, reprelur, playing on the lyre to one of his pupils. This accomplished and benevolent monster was the son of Philira, for whom Saturn assumed the form of a horse. The Marquis of Sligo found at Athens a curious lamp, exhibiting their amour in bas relief. Chiron, in consequence of the shape that his father had taken, was biform, half man, half horse; but the Gods compensated this deformity by the excellent talents with which they endowed him. He was the first who instructed men in the…

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