The Fruit Manual: Containing the Descriptions and Synonyms of the Fruits and Fruit Trees Commonly Met with in the Gardens and Orchards of Great Britain (Classic Reprint)

The Fruit Manual: Containing the Descriptions and Synonyms of the Fruits and Fruit Trees Commonly Met with in the Gardens and Orchards of Great Britain (Classic Reprint)
Author: unknown
Format: Paperback
Pages: 300
Publisher: Forgotten Books (June 26, 2016)
Excerpt from The Fruit Manual: Containing the Descriptions and Synonyms of the Fruits and Fruit Trees Commonly Met With in the Gardens and Orchards of Great Britain
Fifteen years ago I published a Manual of Fruits, which at the time included most of the varieties found in nurseries and private gardens. This being favour ably received, the whole impression was sold within a twelvemonth, and I was repeatedly urged to prepare a new edition.
About that time numerous new varieties of fruits were introduced to British gardens, and it was there fore necessary that their merits should be fairly tested before a new edition could be published of a work pro fessing to furnish information respecting the fruits and fruit trees commonly cultivated in this country.
During the interval that has elapsed I have examined the greater number of the new, and many of the older varieties not formerly included, and I am now enabled to present a work more complete and useful than I could have done had I entered upon it at an earlier period.
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This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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